This page provides an overview of key data on children’s health, social care and education in Portsmouth. It includes information on:

Education

Local authority school places scorecards

The Department for Education (DfE) creates annual scorecards. These show a snapshot of the progress each local authority is making towards ensuring there are enough good quality school places.

Education, employment and training

Data about young people’s education, employment or training status in each local authorites can be explored through interactive scorecards.

Breastfeeding

You can view the breastfeeding interactive data report here.

In Portsmouth in 2022/23:

  • The percentage of babies breastfed at 6 to 8 weeks was 51.7%. This is higher than the average in England (49.1%).

Breast milk provides the ideal nutrition for infants in the first stages of life. There is evidence that babies who are breast fed:

  • experience lower levels of gastro-intestinal and respiratory infection
  • have lower levels of child obesity

There is also evidence that mothers who don’t breastfeed:

  • have an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers
  • may find it more difficult to return to their pre-pregnancy weight

There is more information about this on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence website.

Current guidance recommends that newborns up to six-months-old are exclusively breastfed.

Health visiting service delivery

You can view the health visiting service delivery interactive data report here. This report covers:

  • antenatal contact
  • new birth visits
  • 6 to 8 week reviews
  • the 12 month review
  • and the 2 to 2½ year review

New birth visits

All infants and their families are eligible to receive a visit from a health visitor in the first two weeks from birth. This is known as the New Birth Visit (NBV).

In 2022/23:

  • 23.86% of Portsmouth’s infants received a new birth visit within 14 days compared to 78.87% in England.
  • 72.82% of Portsmouth’s infants received a new birth visit in Portsmouth after 14 days compared to 17.78% in England.

6-8 week reviews

The 6 to 8 week review is an opportunity for:

  • support with breastfeeding if required.
  • assessing the mother’s mental health
  • following up discussions from the new birth visit
  • ensuring the mother has had a six-week postnatal check
  • ensuring the infant has received the infant physical examination
  • reminding of the importance of vaccinations that take place in the first few months
  • supporting the mother around any benefits she may be entitled to

In Portsmouth in 2022/23:

  • the percentage of infants who received a 6-8 week review increased to 87.73% (compared to 73.34% in 2021/22)
  • Portsmouth’s percentage receiving a 6-8 week review was higher than England (79.57%).

12 month reviews

All children should receive a review by a health visitor team shortly before they turn one. This allows for:

  • assessment of the baby’s physical, emotional and social needs within their family, including any risks
  • an opportunity for both parents to talk about any concerns that they may have about their baby’s health
  • a reminder of the importance of the vaccinations at around one year
  • monitoring of the baby’s growth
  • discussions on weaning, oral health and home safety (particularly as babies are now sitting independently, rolling over, and may be starting to walk)
  • an opportunity to discuss health before any future pregnancy

A review between 9 and 12 months ensures any issues can be identified early and referrals made. Sometimes these reviews are a little late, but they are still valuable. Therefore, this data shows the proportion of children who have a 12-month review on time or slightly late (by 15 months).

In 2022/23:

  • the percentage of infants who received a 12 month review by 12 months in Portsmouth was 11.59%
    • this is lower than England (70.92%) and the South East region (74.61%), but similar to Southampton (10.25%).
  • the percentage of infants who received a 12 month review by 15 months in Portsmouth was 70.53%
    • this is lower than England (82.59%) and the South East region (84.31%), but higher than Southampton (44.40%).

2 to 2½ year review

All children and families should receive a review when the child reaches around 2 to 2½ years. This allows for:

  • a review of the child’s health and development
  • an opportunity to discuss health with parents before any future pregnancy, and
  • an opportunity to support the parents with issues such as access to a nursery place (including free provision)
  • a reminder of the importance of the pre-school immunisation booster

In 2022/23:

  • the percentage of infants who received a 2 to 2½ year review in Portsmouth was 62.77%
    • This was lower than England (73.58%) and the South East region (76.31%), but similar to Southampton (59.47%).
  • all infants in Portsmouth (100%) had the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ-3) completed as part of their review
    • This percentage was higher than England (92.51%) and the South East region (94.66%), and the same as Southampton (100%).
    • Information on the previous year (2021/22) is not available for Portsmouth for this due to data validation issues.

Child development

You can view the child development interactive data report here.

Gaps in child development can be recognised in the second year of life. They can have an impact by the time children enter school. If left unsupported, these children are more likely to fail to achieve their full potential. Because of this, all children are eligible for a healthy child programme development review around their second birthday.

The Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ 3) generates data to measure child development outcomes. Health visiting teams should have been using ASQ 3 as part of a child’s two-year reviews since 2015. There are a range of ASQ 3 questionnaires that are used depending on the child’s exact age in months.

ASQ 3 provides an objective measure of development and allows comparisons to be made. This helps to identify children who are not developing as expected and supporting decisions on closer monitoring of progress or early intervention services.

Areas of development which are tested include:

  • communication
  • gross motor skills
  • fine motor skills
  • problem solving
  • personal and social skills

In Portsmouth in 2022/23:

  • the percentage who were at or above the expected level in communication skills decreased to 82.5% (compared to 86.4% in 2017/18)
    • this is lower compared to England (85.3%) and the South East region (88.9%).
  • the percentage who were at or above the expected level in gross motor skills decreased to 93.5% (compared to 96.0% in 2017/18)
    • this is similar compared to England (92.8%) and the South East region (93.0%)
  • the percentage who were at or above the expected level in fine motor skills decreased to 93.6% (compared to 98.4% in 2017/18)
    • this is similar compared to England (92.6%)
  • the percentage who were at or above the expected level in problem solving skills decreased to 90.0% (compared to 97.6% in 2017/18)
    • this is lower compared to England (91.8%)
  • the percentage who were at or above the expected level in personal and social skills decreased to 90.0% (compared to 95.0% in 2017/18)
    • this is similar compared to England (90.3%)
  • the percentage who were at or above the expected level in all five areas of development decreased to 76.0% (compared to 83.9% in 2017/18)
    • this is lower compared to England (79.2%) and the South East region (79.8%)

Childhood vaccinations

You can view the childhood vaccinations interactive data report here.

Vaccination coverage is the best way of telling how much protection an area will have against preventable diseases. Coverage is closely correlated with levels of disease.

Monitoring coverage identifies possible drops in immunity before levels of disease rise.

Selective childhood immunisation programme (Hepatitis B)

Infants born to mothers with hepatitis B (HBV) are at high risk of getting the infection themselves. Babies born to infected mothers are given a dose of the hepatitis B vaccine after they are born. This is followed by another two doses (with a month in between each) and a booster dose 24 months later.

Around 20% of people with chronic hepatitis B will go on to develop scarring of the liver (cirrhosis), which can take 20 years to develop. Around 1 in 10 people with cirrhosis will develop liver cancer.

In 2022/23:

  • Hepatitis B vaccine coverage for 1 year olds in Portsmouth was suppressed due to small numbers. The previous two years had 100% coverage (all 9 in 2020/21 and all 4 one year olds in 2021/22).
  • Hepatitis B vaccine coverage for 2 year olds in Portsmouth was 100% in Portsmouth. All 16 two year olds received the full course of doses of hepatitis B vaccine.

Routine childhood immunisations – 1 year olds

In 2022/23, Portsmouth met the immunisation target of 95% for one year olds for:

  • Pneumococcal disease (PCV) – 96.4%
  • Diphtheria Tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus infuenzae type B (DTaP/IPV/Hib) – 95.2%

Portsmouth didn’t meet the immunisation target of 95% for one year olds for:

  • Meningococcal group B (MenB) – 93.8%
  • Rotavirus (Rota) – 92.7%

Routine childhood immunisations – 2 year olds

In 2022/23, Portsmouth met the immunisation target of 95% for two year olds for:

  • Diphtheria Tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus infuenza type B (DTaP/IPV/Hib) – 95.0%

Portsmouth didn’t meet the immunisation target of 95% for two year olds for:

  • Meningococcal group B (MenB) booster – 91.6%
  • PCV booster – 90.2%
  • first dose of Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) – 90.5%
  • the combined Haemophilus influenza type B and meningitis C (Hib/MenC) booster – 90.1%

Routine childhood immunisations – 5 year olds

In 2022/23, Portsmouth didn’t meet the immunisation target of 95% for two year olds for:

  • MMR (1st and 2nd dose) – 86.2% received both doses, and 93.3% received at least the 1st dose
  • A fourth dose of Diphtheria, Tetanus, Polio and Pertussis (DTaP/IPV) booster – 86.0%

Flu vaccine – 2-3 years and primary school

In 2022/23 in Portsmouth:

  • 49.1% of 2-3 year olds had received a flu vaccine. This is higher than the England average, but below the national target of 65% and lower than the previous year
  • 59.3% of primary school-aged children had received a flu vaccine. This is higher than the England average, but below the national target of 65% and similar to the previous year (58.1%)

Human papillomavirus (HPV) – 12-13 and 13-14 years

In 2021/22 in Portsmouth:

  • 54.8% of boys in Year 8 (12-13 years) had received one dose of HPV. This is lower than the England average.
  • 67.8% of boys in Year 9 (13-14 years) had received the second dose of HPV. This is higher than the England average.
  • 67.0% of girls in Year 8 (12-13 years) had received one dose of HPV. This was similar to the England average.
  • 74.4% of girls in Year 9 (13-14 years) had received the second dose of HPV. This was higher than the England average.

MenACWY conjugate vaccine – 14-15 years

In 2021/22 in Portsmouth:

  • 77.3% of 14-15 year olds had received the MenACWY vaccine. This was lower than England (79.6%) and the South East region (84.0%).

Portsmouth last met the target for this vaccine in 2018/19.

Children's healthy weight

Childhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century. Overweight and obese children are:

  • likely to stay obese into adulthood
  • more likely to develop diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age

Overweight and obesity, as well as their related diseases, are largely preventable. Prevention of childhood obesity therefore needs to be a high priority.

Data is collected by the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP), which uses a standard measure to assess all children when they start and leave primary school.

In Portsmouth in 2022/23:

  • 26.3% of Year R pupils (4-5 years old) were overweight or obese, increasing from 25.6% in 2021/22.
    • This remains higher than pre-pandemic levels
    • This percentage is significantly higher than the England average (21.3%)
  • 10.7% of Year R pupils (4-5 years old) were obese or severely obese, decreasing from 12.2% in 2021/22
    • This is a return to pre-pandemic levels
    • This percentage is significantly higher than the England average (9.2%)
  • 2.8% of Year R pupils (4-5 years old) were severely obese, decreasing from 3.7% in 2021/22
    • This is a return to pre-pandemic levels
    • This percentage is similar to the England average (2.5%)
  • 41.3% of Year 6 pupils (10-11 years old) were overweight or obese, decreasing from 42.3% in 2021/22
    • This remains higher than pre-pandemic levels
    • This percentage is significantly higher than the England average (36.6%)
  • 25.7% of Year 6 pupils (10-11 years old) were obese or severely obese, decreasing from 27.3% in 2021/22
    • This remains higher than pre-pandemic levels
    • This percentage is significantly higher than the England average (22.7%)
  • 6.1% of Year 6 pupils (10-11 years old) were severely obese, decreasing from 7.2% in 2021/22
    • This percentage is similar to the England average (5.7%)

For more information on child obesity (including information by gender, deprivation or smaller areas within Portsmouth), you can request the JSNA healthy weight briefing by emailing jsna@portsmouthcc.gov.uk.

Teenage conceptions

You can view the teenage conceptions interactive data report here.

Most teenage pregnancies are unplanned and around half end in an abortion. As well as it being an avoidable experience for the young woman, abortions represent an avoidable cost to the NHS.

While for some women having a child when young can be a positive turning point in their lives, for many more teenagers bringing up a child is extremely difficult. It often results in poor outcomes for both the teenage parent and the child in terms of the baby’s health, the mother’s emotional health and wellbeing, and the likelihood of both the parent and child living in long-term poverty.

In 2021 in Portsmouth:

  • the conception rate was 17.1 per 1,000 females aged 15-17 years (54 conceptions in total). This rate is similar to Southampton and England, but higher than the South East region.

Between 2019-2021, the Portsmouth under 16 years conception rate was significantly higher than England and the South East region.

Safeguarding

Portsmouth Safeguarding Children Partnership (PSCP)

The Portsmouth Safeguarding Children Partnership (PSCP) provides the arrangements under which the Safeguarding Partners and relevant agencies work together to coordinate their services to safeguard and promote the welfare of children in Portsmouth.

Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND)

The Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Parent and Carer Consultation 2023

A consultation with the parents and carers of children and young people that interact with the SEND system was carried out. This was to better understand if the services are meeting the needs of users. Comparisons have been made with previous data to track progress.

Further information

The Local Authority Interactive Tool (LAIT) is an interactive spreadsheet for comparing data about children and young people across all local authorities in England.