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Mental health support

Things that could help
Getting advice

The impact on a young person

  • Anxiety that is short-term, noticeable but non-problematic.
  • Nervousness, irritability, impatience, sadness, feeling overwhelmed.
  • Avoidance of school, seeing friends or doing activities.
  • Tired, low energy, muscle tension, headaches

Pathway

  • Young person or parent speaks with teacher, youth worker, peer, GP etc
  • Share ‘Things that could help’
  • Recommend young person registers with KOOTH.com
  • Speak to school’s pastoral support such as an ELSA
  • If young person improves support them to continue to Thrive with ‘Things that could help’
  • If young person continues to struggle or is getting worse see support options in ‘Getting Help’ pathway
Getting help

The impact on a young person

  • Anxiety that is becoming problematic, appears out of context or disproportionate to the reason why they might be worrying.
  • Some episodes of panicking such as getting distressed, racing heart rate, quicker breathing, feeling dizzy or faint, vomiting, shaking.
  • Anger, withdrawal, pervasive sadness, hopelessness, poor concentration, increased fatigue, aches/ pains.

Pathway

  • Young person or parent speaks with teacher, youth worker, peer, GP etc
  • Speak to school pastoral support (e.g. ELSA)
  • School consult with MHST and refer if appropriate
  • KOOTH.com including 1-1 counselling
  • If young person improves support them to continue to Thrive with ‘Things that could help’
  • If young person continues to struggle or is getting worse see ‘Getting More Help’ pathway
Getting more help

The impact on a young person

  • These anxieties or episodes of low mood/depression are severe and enduring. These cause significant distress to a young person and significantly disrupts daily coping such as school/college, socialising and self-care activities (e.g. sleeping, bathing, eating).
  • Regular episodes of panicking such as getting distressed, racing heart rate, quicker breathing, feeling dizzy or faint, vomiting, shaking.
  • Isolating self from friends and family, feeling hopeless about future.

Pathway

  • Young person or parent speaks with teacher, youth worker, peer, GP etc
  • School to consult with MHST and refer if appropriate
  • Referral to Specialist CAMHS
  • If young person improves, support them with a robust maintenance plan and signpost ‘Things that could help’
  • If young person is in crisis see ‘Getting Crisis Support’ pathway
Getting crisis support

The impact on a young person

Intense emotional distress with a high risk to self and others – for example, the young person is verbalising a plan to harm themself or others and the family or network is not able to contain or manage the issue without urgent intervention.

Pathway

  • Any urgent concerns about a mental health problem use the NHS 111 online service at 111.nhs.uk or call 111.
  • If the young person has injured themselves or taken an overdose or are in an emergency and their life is at risk, dial 999 or go to the nearest emergency department.
  • Identify lead professional, step across to ‘Getting More Help’, support discharge plan.
Description of support services

Kooth.com

KOOTH.com is an online emotional health/wellbeing service for 11-18 (up to 25 for care leavers and those with an Education Health & Care Plan).

No referral needed, just visit Kooth.com and register anonymously.  The site is available 24/7 with counselling available 12pm – 10pm on weekdays and 6pm – 10pm on weekends.

Schools pastoral support

All secondary schools have a named Mental Health Lead and a range of pastoral support available.  Schools also work with other professionals in order to gain advice and guidance on how best to support children’s social and emotional needs. These services may include the Portsmouth Educational Psychology Team, the Multi-Agency Behaviour Support Team and the Inclusion Outreach team.  Within many schools, pastoral support may be provided by Emotional Literacy Support Assistants (ELSAs). ELSAs are teaching assistants or learning mentors in schools who have been trained by Educational Psychologists to work with children who are showing a wide range of emotional or social needs for example; anxiety, low self-esteem, problems with anger etc. Through a range of support programmes ELSAs help children to develop their social and emotional skills.

Mental Health Support Teams (MHST’s)

MHST deliver evidence based early interventions for children and young people with mild to moderate mental health problems. This includes 1:1 high/low intensity CBT work with parents and group work.  MHST are available in all secondary schools across Portsmouth.  Young people/parents can speak to their school about making a referral to MHST.

Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS)

Specialist CAMHS deliver evidenced based treatment for mental health disorders. Can include medication and talking therapies on a 1-2-1, group or family basis.

Available Monday to Friday, 9am-5pm

Contact: 0300 123 6632.

Eating disorder support

Things that could help
  • BEAT is a national charity providing information, help and support for people affected by eating disorders. Support includes a helpline, online support groups and advice and guidance.
  • Kooth.com provides an online emotional health and wellbeing service for ages 11-18
  • The Anna Freud Centre for Children and Families and YoungMinds provide a range of different types of support for children, young people, parents and their families.
  • The Little Blue Book of Sunshine has tips on how to deal with problems such as anxiety, stress, body image, relationships and anger. It is available for free from Google Play Store  and Apple Books
Getting advice

The impact on a young person

  • Body dissatisfaction/worrying about appearance.
  • Comparing themselves to other people.
  • Taking a more active interest in food, fitness, health or wellbeing.

Pathway

  • Young person or parent speaks with teacher, youth worker, peer, GP etc
  • Share ‘Things that could help’
  • See GP for physical health observations to be done – height, weight, blood pressure, pulse
  • If young person improves support them to continue to Thrive with ‘Things that could help’
  • If young person continues to struggle or is getting worse see support options in ‘Getting More Help’ pathway
Getting help

The impact on a young person

A committed and persistent effort to lose weight or control weight or shape through dieting/ restricting food intake/exercising/ increased activity/purging (self-induced vomiting).

Pathway

  • Young person or parent speaks with teacher, youth worker, peer, GP etc
  • Seek advice and consultation from the CAMHS Specialist Eating Disorder Team
  • If young person improves, support them with a robust maintenance plan and signpost ‘Things that could help’
  • If young person continues to struggle or is getting worse see ‘Getting More Help & Crisis Support’ pathway
Getting more help and crisis support

The impact on a young person

  • Significant restriction of food (and fluid) leading to rapid weight loss.
  • Significant distress prior to, during or after meals.
  • Significant preoccupation with food/eating/weight or shape or having rituals around eating/preparing food.

Pathway

  • Seek urgent advice and consultation from the CAMHS Specialist Eating Disorder Team
  • Requires urgent medical attention either through an urgent GP appointment or urgent visit to hospital emergency department
  • Identify a lead professional and support young person with discharge plan actions.
Description of support services

CAMHS Eating Disorder Team

The focus of the team is on anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorders.

They offer face-to-face, web based, and telephone support on a needs-led basis.

Available Monday to Friday, 9am – 5pm

Contact 0300 123 6632.

Documents

SEMH Quick reference guide for 11 to 16 year olds
SEMH Quick reference guide on Eating Disorders